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Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly

Posted by Michael On September 23rd
109 cover Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly

Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly

We hope you enjoyed our latest series of blog posts about rugose spiraling whiteflies!

We know how frustrating these pests can sometimes be. You try to take care of your landscaping so your family can enjoy it, but sometimes Mother Nature has her own agenda!

That’s why we consolidated everything you need to know into these ten posts:

  1. What are Rugose Spiraling Whiteflies?
  2. Pictures of Rugose Spiraling Whitefly Symptoms
  3. Will Rugose Spiraling Whiteflies Kill My Plants?
  4. What Plants Do Rugose Spiraling Whiteflies Damage?
  5. What Should I Do If I Have a Spiraling Whitefly Infestation?
  6. Can I Treat Spiraling Whiteflies Myself?
  7. What’s the Best Way to Treat Spiraling Whiteflies?
  8. Will Spiraling Whitefly Treatments Hurt My Family or Pets?
  9. How Long Will It Take to Get Rid of Spiraling Whiteflies?
  10. If I Treat Spiraling Whiteflies, Can I Get Re-infested from My Neighbors?

You can read each tip as a blog article, or you can download them all in one convenient free eBook: Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest.

10 275 FRED 150DPI 01 18 05 10. If I Treat Spiraling Whiteflies, Can I Get Re infested from My Neighbors?If you’ve successfully eliminated a spiraling whitefly infestation from your yard, congratulations! Now it’s time to look at your strategy for the future.

As with any troublesome infestation, homeowners usually ask us if they need to worry about the bugs returning. Our answer is, “Don’t worry, but be prepared.”

Most professional spiraling whitefly treatments will last up to one year. After that, it is possible to be re-infested. There are several things you can do to minimize the risk.

This is the last of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

First, check with your neighbors. If you recently eliminated spiraling whiteflies from your plants, it’s possible that the bugs are still feeding off your neighbors’ untreated foliage. Since the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly is relatively new to Florida, it’s possible that your neighbors haven’t heard about it. Offer to pass this free information along so they can learn to protect themselves.

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 9. How Long Will It Take to Get Rid of Spiraling Whiteflies?One of the questions we often hear is, “How quickly will my spiraling whiteflies be gone?”

Assuming your plants are receiving properly-applied systemic insecticide, it can depend on the size of the plant, the extent of the infestation, and the time of year.

This is the ninth of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

We notice quicker turnaround times for smaller plants. For example, an average small palm or shrub can be on the road to recovery two weeks after the first treatment. A large palm tree, however, could take much longer. Some may remain infested a month after treatment if the original spiraling whiteflies were well established.

When a systemic insecticide is used in a tree injection, it may last up to one year. After it’s gone, spiraling whiteflies might return to feed on the same plant.

Spring is generally a good time to apply systemic insecticide. If applied other times it may take slightly longer to work.

Remember, if you still see white wax or black mold after a treatment has been applied, it does not mean that your treatment didn’t work! The residue may remain even after the spiraling whiteflies are gone.

08 575 iStock 000003888607Small family 8. Will Spiraling Whitefly Treatments Hurt My Family or Pets?

The pesticides most commonly used to treat spiraling whitefly infestations contain neonicotinoids (nee-oh-NICK-uh-tin-oids). These chemicals were developed to mimic the natural insecticidal properties of nicotine, while reducing harmful effects on mammals.

This is the eighth of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

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07 575 best whitefly treatment 7. Whats the Best Way to Treat Spiraling Whiteflies?

As with any pest infestation, there are multiple ways to bring the problem under control. The ideal method of spiraling whitefly elimination is to support biological controls. Allowing natural predators to feed on whiteflies will dramatically reduce their population, rendering them unable to inflict serious harm on landscaping.

Unfortunately, ideal does not mean practical. Biological solutions may take a long time to work. As of this writing, it is not recommended to try to introduce ladybugs or other predators to control a spiraling whitefly population.

Chemical options include contact insecticides and systemic insecticides.

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6. Can I Treat Spiraling Whiteflies Myself?

Posted by Angela On July 10th

06 300 spiraling whitefly pesticides 6. Can I Treat Spiraling Whiteflies Myself?Yes, you can purchase and apply non-restricted pesticides on your own property.

Garden centers, nurseries and some home improvement stores carry products that may help. Horticultural oil and insecticidal soap may be useful for small applications. Keep in mind, though, that products available to the general public are less effective than chemicals available to professionals.

This is the sixth of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

Repeated applications may be necessary. It’s important to follow the guidelines shown on the product label.

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05 300 no pruning 5. What Should I Do If I Have a Spiraling Whitefly Infestation?Before treating, you should be sure that the symptoms in your landscaping are actually caused by the spiraling whitefly instead of other pests or diseases. The whitish coating on leaves could also be powdery mildew, which is sometimes mistaken for spiraling whitefly infestation. A pest control professional will be able to identify the difference between spiraling whitefly wax and powdery mildew.

This is the fifth of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

Assuming that you have a spiraling whitefly infestation, what should you do? You may be tempted to remove the plant entirely, but this may be too drastic. Take comfort in knowing that most plants can be treated, and you will likely not need to remove them.

If you only have a small plant or two that is covered with the white, waxy substance, you may try to solve the problem by yourself. Wash the plants off with water, removing all the white substance. Insecticidal soap may offer additional help in removing the bug.

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04 rugose spiraling whitefly plants 4. What Plants Do Rugose Spiraling Whiteflies Damage?The Rugose Spiraling Whitefly was originally called the Gumbo Limbo Spiraling Whitefly, because the first plants it was seen attacking were gumbo-limbo trees. Unfortunately, this bug isn’t a picky eater! Part of what makes the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly so insidious is that it can live on a wide range of plants and trees, such as:

Fruit and Edible Plants
Citrus, mango, guava, banana, avocado and others.

Palm Trees
King palm, coconut palm, sabal palm and other less common palms.

Ornamentals
Gumbo-limbo, black olive, seagrapes, buttonwood, live oak, wax myrtle, and bird of paradise.

This is the fourth of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

If you have landscaping, it’s likely that you have plants on this list. Because the spiraling whitefly is able to eat such a broad range of vegetation, you can see why its territory is expanding.

If you or your neighbors suspect a spiraling whitefly infestation on one plant, you should check all vegetation nearby. Because the it can feed on so many species, it can easily spread to neighboring plants.

For a more comprehensive list of vulnerable species, see the Host Plants document at the University of Florida IFAS Extension website.

03 575 bad leaves 3. Will Rugose Spiraling Whiteflies Kill My Plants?

It’s natural to be worried if you start noticing dying leaves, wilted foliage, and yellowing in your plants and trees. You may be concerned that you’re at risk of losing valuable parts of your landscaping.

The danger is most pronounced for young trees, new plantings or landscaping that has already been suffering from another difficulty. These plants are at higher risk, and it’s possible that they could die without intervention.

This is the third of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

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02 250 whitefly spiral 2. Pictures of Rugose Spiraling Whitefly Symptoms

Rugose Spiraling Whitefly waxy spiral

What are the symptoms of Rugose Spiraling Whitefly infestation?

1. Wilted, Unhealthy Leaves

Are your trees or plants looking unhealthy? Do you see wilted leaves, stunted growth, dropping fronds, or yellowing? These are a few of the warning signs that may point to a spiraling whitefly infestation. When spiraling whiteflies feed off the underside of your plants, their needle-like mouths steal the nutrients needed to maintain healthy foliage, so unhealthy leaves may be the first sign you notice.

This is the second of ten articles from a Complete Guide to the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly: 10 Things You Need to Know about this New Florida Pest, a free eBook.

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